Freud

excitement and growth, absurd

I've written several posts recently about the psychological theory that Paul Goodman spelled out in his contribution to the 1951 book Gestalt Therapy: Excitement and Growth in the Human Personality. In my view, it is an admirable and thought-provoking attempt to synthesize the essential insights of Freud and Wilhelm Reich with the assumptions of philosophical pragmatism and express all that in un-jargony language applicable to empirical experience.

hunger, aggression, excitement and growth

In two prior posts I discussed the relationship between Fritz Perls and Paul Goodman and the novel psychological theory that resulted from their shared work on the book Gestalt Therapy: Excitement and Growth in the Human Personality (co-authored with Ralph Hefferline, 1951).

the contact boundary

In my last post I discussed the 1951 book Gestalt Therapy, co-written by Fritz Perls, Paul Goodman, and Ralph Hefferline. For a landmark work of clinical psychology, it's a curiously schizophrenic book. One half, written by Goodman from ideas and notes by Perls, is a dense and cogent exposition of the personality theory in which Gestalt therapy is grounded.