Depression

The Society I Live In Is Mine

Paul Goodman was a public figure who did not shrink from taking action in support of his beliefs. In the biopic PAUL GOODMAN CHANGED MY LIFE you'll see him alongside draft resisters; speaking out at peace rallies; going before the Board of Ed with radical reform proposals for New York City schools; advocating the banning of cars from Manhattan; and telling elite defense contractors they're the world's most dangerous men. Goodman's formal career in politics advanced no further than a school board position on Manhattan's west side.

Decent Poverty Report: Bust and Boom

This reporter's parents were born in the early 1930s. Their worldview was formed by their Depression-era childhood, by World War II, and by the postwar era in which they grew to adulthood. They had the good fortune, and the talent, to follow in their own lives the trajectory of the American economy's greatest bust-to-boom. But their values remained Depression values, so they were always more grounded than giddy as they ascended toward material success. An aphorism my father taught me expresses what I mean concisely: "Once you're poor, you're never rich."

This reporter was born in 1967.

Decent Poverty Report: our depression

I don't know why so few people utter the word "depression" to describe the economic conditions in America over the past year or two. I suppose some people believe on principle that as long as things don't get as bad as they got at the nadir of the thirties—and they haven't—we're not entitled to the word. Certainly the corporate news media and those who take their cue from them, patrolling the public discourse like vigilantes, wouldn't think of using it.